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Thursday, July 30, 2015

Many Utilities See Window Film As A Cost-Effective Way To Cut Peak Demand

Hot Temperatures, Water Shortages and Power Plants Nearing Capacity May Create A Perfect Storm For Power Gaps

Washington, D.C. -- July 27, 2015 -- Utilities and government energy information centers recommend using window film as an effective way to reduce peak demand and save consumer's money, according to the nonprofit International Window Film Association (IWFA).

The pressure is on power generation as hydroelectric production in states like California plunged 60 percent from 2011 to 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, and last month, the U.S. had its second-warmest June on record, with five western states California, Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Utah, actually at record-breaking temperatures.

"When you have a situation that combines our aging, mid-century electrical grid with increasing peak energy demand, but not a lot of new generating capacity, we may face brownout situations," said Darrell Smith, executive director of the IWFA.

According to information shared by many utilities, solar control window films applied to existing glass in windows and doors are an effective method to reduce peak demand during hot months and conserve energy. In addition to the energy management benefits, their use may also reduce exposure to ultraviolet radiation and reduce glare, as well as save on utility bills. They recommend visiting the IWFA website for more information. 

"As the sun heats up during the day, so do temperatures inside buildings. A/C systems often must work overtime during the costliest period of the day, when peak electric rates are charged," said Smith. 

Whether placed on the outside or inside of glass, window film may cut cooling costs by 30 percent, repel about 80 percent of solar heat gain and some offer similar energy savings as low-e glass. Return on investment is often less than three years and some utilities offer rebates for window film. The IWFA estimates installing window film may cost up to 91.5 percent less than installing new windows.

About the International Window Film Association

The International Window Film Association (IWFA) is a nonprofit organization of window film dealers, distributors and manufacturers that facilitates the growth of the industry by providing research, influencing policy and promoting consumer awareness of the many benefits of window film. Like us on Facebook follow us on Twitter and see more information on YouTube

Contact:

Steve Capoccia
steve@warnerpr.com
617 372 1539

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